Featured Pathways

More pathways

The Science of Climate Change

Climate change is no longer a distant threat or just a possibility, it is now a reality for all of us. In this pathway, Kevin Trenberth, a renowned climatologist, delves into the science behind climate change. He first introduces the climate system, its main components and forces.

Tackling the Plastic Crisis

Plastic pollution is by far the biggest threat to our oceans and this remains an incredibly tough problem to solve. Plastic credits could potentially serve as one of the much needed solutions for this crisis.

More pathways

Book a demo

Pricing

Ready to get started?

Plans & Membership

Our Platform

Expert led content

+1,000 expert presented, on-demand video modules

Learning analytics

Keep track of learning progress with our comprehensive data

Interactive learning

Engage with our video hotspots and knowledge check-ins

Testing & certification

Gain CPD / CPE credits and professional certification

Managed learning

Build, scale and manage your organisation’s learning

Integrations

Connect Sustainability Unlocked to your current platform

Featured Content

More featured content

The Scale of the Net Zero Challenge

The price of meeting net zero is estimated to be between $100-150 trillion over the next 30 years. Regardless of this cost, we need to reach net zero before climate change does irreversible damage to the environment and the economy.

ESG, Sustainability and Impact Jargon Buster

ESG, sustainability, impact… they all just mean green, right? Not quite. Despite being used often interchangeably, there are distinct differences between these terms.

More featured content

Book a demo

Pricing

Ready to get started?

Featured Pathways

More pathways

The Science of Climate Change

Climate change is no longer a distant threat or just a possibility, it is now a reality for all of us. In this pathway, Kevin Trenberth, a renowned climatologist, delves into the science behind climate change. He first introduces the climate system, its main components and forces.

Tackling the Plastic Crisis

Plastic pollution is by far the biggest threat to our oceans and this remains an incredibly tough problem to solve. Plastic credits could potentially serve as one of the much needed solutions for this crisis.

More pathways

Book a demo

Pricing

Ready to get started?

Plans & Membership

Our Platform

Expert led content

+1,000 expert presented, on-demand video modules

Learning analytics

Keep track of learning progress with our comprehensive data

Interactive learning

Engage with our video hotspots and knowledge check-ins

Testing & certification

Gain CPD / CPE credits and professional certification

Managed learning

Build, scale and manage your organisation’s learning

Integrations

Connect Sustainability Unlocked to your current platform

Featured Content

More featured content

The Scale of the Net Zero Challenge

The price of meeting net zero is estimated to be between $100-150 trillion over the next 30 years. Regardless of this cost, we need to reach net zero before climate change does irreversible damage to the environment and the economy.

ESG, Sustainability and Impact Jargon Buster

ESG, sustainability, impact… they all just mean green, right? Not quite. Despite being used often interchangeably, there are distinct differences between these terms.

More featured content

Book a demo

Pricing

Ready to get started?

Book a demo

Pricing

Ready to get started?

Introduction to Human Rights Due Diligence

Introduction to Human Rights Due Diligence

Kate Larsen

20 years: Human Rights and Supply Chains

In this video, Kate explores how businesses and investors have been learning about human rights risks and how to address them, drawing insights from civil society and other intelligence sources, a practice that has been ongoing for many years and is becoming increasingly prevalent.

In this video, Kate explores how businesses and investors have been learning about human rights risks and how to address them, drawing insights from civil society and other intelligence sources, a practice that has been ongoing for many years and is becoming increasingly prevalent.

Subscribe to watch

Access this and all of the content on our platform by signing up for a 7-day free trial.

Introduction to Human Rights Due Diligence

16 mins 18 secs

Key learning objectives:

  • Understand how business identify and assess impacts

  • Identify stakeholders and methods for human rights risk assessments

  • Understand the critical role of integrating human rights risk assessments to enhance business resilience

Overview:

Business human rights due diligence involves identifying, assessing, and addressing human rights impacts within a company's value chain. This process includes engaging with stakeholders, leveraging insights from civil society reports, and considering environmental factors. Companies often hire professionals with expertise in sustainability and human rights to conduct thorough assessments. Guided by frameworks like the UN Guiding Principles and OECD standards, businesses are encouraged to integrate their findings into actionable strategies, thereby mitigating risks, enhancing resilience, and fostering positive social change.

Subscribe to watch

Access this and all of the content on our platform by signing up for a 7-day free trial.

Summary
What are the key concepts of the UNGPs?

The UNGPs are based on three pillars:
- The state duty to protect human rights
- The corporate responsibility to respect human rights
- Access to remedy for victims of business-related abuses

Businesses are expected to understand and implement these pillars, particularly by conducting human rights due diligence in line with the UNGPs' guidance. This involves engaging stakeholders, assessing risks, mitigating where necessary, using leverage to drive improvements, remedying human rights violations, and reporting on these actions.

What are salient human rights, and how should businesses address them?

Salient human rights refer to the human rights most affected by business operations, rather than just material impacts. Businesses should focus on where risks to people's human rights are most significant. For instance:
- In care home acquisitions, the risk of forced labour among foreign migrant staff might be more salient than material risks like asbestos presence

Companies are encouraged to map salient human rights risks carefully by considering both country and sector-specific issues and using available guidance and data tools.

#What does the UNGPs concept of complicity entail?

Complicity in the UNGPs extends beyond the legal definition to include situations where a business benefits from abuses committed by others. This can happen when businesses:
- Reduce costs due to slave-like practices in their supply chains
- Fail to speak out against abuses related to their operations, products, or services

Businesses are expected to remedy adverse human rights impacts and prevent further occurrences, often involving compensation, apologies, and rehabilitation.

How should businesses use leverage to ensure remedy and prevent human rights abuses?

Businesses are expected to use their leverage to help ensure remedy for affected stakeholders and prevent further human rights abuses. This is especially important in supply chains or large infrastructure projects where multiple buyers or investors are involved. By collaborating legally, businesses can:
- Prevent confusion and conflicting expectations for improvements from suppliers.
- Speed up remedies and reward businesses that deliver improvements to affected people.

Collaboration helps achieve better outcomes for human rights issues across supply chains and projects.

Subscribe to watch

Access this and all of the content on our platform by signing up for a 7-day free trial.

Kate Larsen

Kate Larsen

Kate Larsen is a Director at SupplyESChange advising and training Investors and Companies on Environmental and Social issues of ESG, especially, human rights risk management in global supply chains. She has worked over 20 years on supply chain ESG including leading Asia Corporate Responsibility in the UK FTSE100 company Burberry and as a Global Director Responsible Sourcing in a US Nasdaq listed retailer.

There are no available Videos from "Kate Larsen"