Global Initiatives to Enhance Supply Chain Sustainability

Global Initiatives to Enhance Supply Chain Sustainability

Kate Larsen

20 years: Human Rights and Supply Chains

We’ve seen examples of supply chain abuse and explored how this problem has been allowed to proliferate. Now we move onto solutions. In this video, Kate outlines global principles and national legislation that have been passed on supply chain transparency and discusses how successful these have been in practice. She also explores how the industry is responding, from pushing the EU for more effective legislation to joining global standards guidance.

We’ve seen examples of supply chain abuse and explored how this problem has been allowed to proliferate. Now we move onto solutions. In this video, Kate outlines global principles and national legislation that have been passed on supply chain transparency and discusses how successful these have been in practice. She also explores how the industry is responding, from pushing the EU for more effective legislation to joining global standards guidance.

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Global Initiatives to Enhance Supply Chain Sustainability

13 mins 45 secs

Overview

Conflict minerals (such as tin, tungsten, tantalum and gold) used by tech, auto and other hardware and metal goods making companies were being purchased from supply chains going back to conflicts in countries such as the Democratic Republic of the Congo. In January 2012, the California Transparency in Supply Chains Act mandated that businesses over a certain size and operating in California publish a statement on their website detailing their efforts to eradicate slavery and human trafficking. The UK Modern Slavery Act Transparency in Supply Chains clause requires disclosures by companies with a UK registered business and over £36 million in global turnover. This law has driven thousands of companies to look at whether modern slavery might exist in their global supply chains.

Key learning objectives:

  • Identify legislation on supply chain transparency

  • Understand the efficacy of these laws and principles

  • Learn how the industry is responding to supply chain abuse

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Summary
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Expert
Kate Larsen

Kate Larsen

Kate Larsen is a Director at SupplyESChange advising and training Investors and Companies on Environmental and Social issues of ESG, especially, human rights risk management in global supply chains. She has worked over 20 years on supply chain ESG including leading Asia Corporate Responsibility in the UK FTSE100 company Burberry and as a Global Director Responsible Sourcing in a US Nasdaq listed retailer.

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